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I've been choking on my own tongue almost every time I see coverage of health care reform. I'm choking on Medicaid recipients decrying socialized medicine and insurance company-sponsored Astroturf mobs at town hall meetings. It makes me sick that public discourse is disrupted by blatant, deliberate lies and threats of violence towards politicians and Obama-backing union members.

Of course, Palin had to pipe in with her two cents of deranged foolishness:

The America I know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with Down Syndrome will have to stand in front of Obama's "death panel" so his bureaucrats can decide, based on a subjective judgment of their "level of productivity in society," whether they are worthy of health care. Such a system is downright evil.

Invoking Michele Batshit Bachmann sure is a sound way to solidify your point, Palin:

Rep. Michele Bachmann highlighted the Orwellian thinking of the president's health care advisor, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, the brother of the White House chief of staff, in a floor speech to the House of Representatives. I commend her for being a voice for the most precious members of our society, our children and our seniors.

Palin, you are a fucking moron. Shut up. You shame us all with your stupid.

Even Politico is in on the Stupid.

So many people are shaming us all with stupid. Like this gem:

Patients First is a project of Americans for Prosperity–one of the key conservative interests groups helping to organize the town hall protests we’ve been covering. The speaker repeats the debunked conservative canard that Democratic health care reform will mandate physician assisted suicide. “Adolf Hitler issued six million end of life orders–he called his program the final solution. I kind of wonder what we’re going to call ours.”

And after comparing Democratic health care reform efforts to the murderous regimes of Hitler, Stalin, and Pol Pot, the speaker advises his audience to “go to offices of members of Congress and put the fear of god in them.”


Really? Godwin’s Law? Has the Republican party become the internetz?

Ugh, fuck it. Can't bring myself to post more, I'm too revolted.

Comments

( 52 comments — Leave a comment )
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muppetk
Aug. 8th, 2009 07:33 am (UTC)
Really? Godwin’s Law? Has the Republican party become the internetz?

Funny, that's more or less exactly what I thought when watching recent eps of Maddow's Show. I mean. REALLY? Hitler comparisons? The people who've barely been bothering to hide their racism are comparing a black man to hitler???? REALLY???

I've been afraid of an assassination attempt (not on *me*) since January, and this isn't helping those fears any...

Um. That was a downer. Sorry. Here, have a kitty: http://is.gd/27wz0
misslynx
Aug. 8th, 2009 08:04 am (UTC)
I can't even begin to follow what passes for "logic" amongst those people. How on earth does making health care more accessible = killing people?

Right now, there are REAL people dying needlessly in the US because they don't have health insurance and can't afford to see a doctor. Somehow that doesn't matter to them. But if you dare to suggest they switch to a system where those people can actually get health care, then OMG EVERYONE WILL DIE!!!

I think the US is the only developed country that doesn't have some kind of public health system, and I don't see the rest of us dying in droves just yet. Don't American conservatives ever look beyond their own borders?
butterbuns
Aug. 8th, 2009 06:29 pm (UTC)
there are REAL people dying needlessly in the US because they don't have health insurance and can't afford to see a doctor. Somehow that doesn't matter to them.

This!! This is the exact point I tried to make to a friend of mine, who only turned around and said "Well, where you live people have to wait forever to see a doctor!"

...funny, I've never waited more than a month, at a college clinic, with like, 4 doctors that treat up to 16,000 people. Nor have I waited longer than that when trying to find an actual doctor.

Free health care, good thing. And if you HAVE the money to be able to go elsewhere and get faster/more treatment, great. A lot of people, especially in this economy, don't.

Aregh.
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(Anonymous)
Aug. 8th, 2009 08:14 am (UTC)
Fear of a Black President...
...is what I am convinced that 98% of this boils down to. The thing that pisses me off the most about the whole "kill your granny" thing is the cynicism and insensitivity in light of Obama's relationship with his own grandmother and how heartbroken he was when she passed. The poor pawns screaming and crying at the town hall meetings may not be aware of this, but the people who concocted and spoon-fed them those lies are. Those spin-meisters know it doesn't take much to set those people off--the black man is the bogey-man, and they don't have to face their own racism if they can attribute that fear to something else, no matter how nonsensical.

There *are* people who are deemed to sick to care for, but not by the government--by the insurance companies. That is what we have *now*.

Thanks for a thoughtful rant,

Beastie
naeelah
Aug. 8th, 2009 04:26 pm (UTC)
Re: Fear of a Black President...
A lot of the commentary I've heard seems to suggest that. :( As much as people try to talk about the issues, things they say all lead back to fear of a President who is not from a solidly WASP family. He is a different species from the Bushes and Kennedys, he doesn't play the same political games they've been operated on for decades, and they can't handle that.

They don't realize that they've been spoon fed lies, but I don't think they care, because the lies give them the ammunition they want and need. They would rather have false accusations than no accusations at all, because then it's just down to admitting "he's different and I don't like him."
elvie
Aug. 8th, 2009 08:34 am (UTC)
Palin and her ilk are even more moronic than I thought :(

The UK's national health system isn't perfect, but at least it's there - people don't die because they can't afford to see a doctor, or sit wondering whether their baby is sick enough to warrant the cost of a doctor's appointment.

Maybe I have too simple a view of this, but it seems to me that this system will benefit the poor and if everyone else is happy paying for their insurance to cover their care and get the more 'luxury' treatment, then they can carry on doing so.

It depresses me that socialism is such a dirty word among many here and that welfare for the poor is so despised.
ascrodin
Aug. 10th, 2009 02:45 pm (UTC)
[quote]
It depresses me that socialism is such a dirty word among many here and that welfare for the poor is so despised.
[/quote]

Well, I don't want all those freeloaders stealing my hard earned money that I shouldn't even be paying to that there government that's spends way too much money!!!

Just kidding! But honestly, I know people who actually think that way...living in a GOP-dominated small town is very depressing!!
stephanielay
Aug. 8th, 2009 08:51 am (UTC)
Oh the fucking irony - as I understand it, the proposed plans will give you something closer akin to our National Health Service, where health care is delivered free to everyone who requires it, regardless of ability to pay?

Dunno if it's filtered over to your side much, but the current hot debate in healthcare here isn't (and never has been) "OMG Granny got a cold, she's going to be culled to reduce her non-productive burden on our taxes" but "OMG Granny has an incurable condition causing her distress and agony, and if we try to help her to die with dignity, we'll be prosecuted for it." (Terry Pratchett has written eloquently on the subject.)

I've grown up with the NHS all my life, of course, so the very idea that you'd have to pay to see a good doctor is just a bit bizarre to me. All the breast-beating roaring against the proposals seems like a protest too much, to be honest. It's a good idea - not perfect - but better than the alternative. (As ever, IMHO.)
goth_hobbit
Aug. 8th, 2009 08:52 am (UTC)
Mrs. Cleaver Palin had better hope that Ward doesn't lose his job -- and the insurance that comes with it -- so that she never has to go through the Special Hell that will be finding any (let alone affordable) coverage for the Beaver wee Trig.

After all, Down Syndrome is a pre-existing condition. Talk about trying to actively kill your kid.

But then, this is the same woman whose tenure as governor saw Medicaid so badly mismanaged that some 200 people died while waiting to enroll in the program -- which is now under an enrollment freeze while the Federal government tries to clean it up. The same woman who cut state funding for programs targeting handicapped children while promoting herself as her protector. Bachmann is no better, and she's a direct beneficiary of a government-sponsored, single-payer health care plan.

Honestly, I sometimes think that what these idiots who oppose what amounts to an expansion of Medicare are really afraid of is this: if people who are currently at the mercy of high-premium / low coverage insurance were better able to get basic preventative care (among other things) through a single-payer system, then said people would have one less giant metaphorical sword hanging over their heads. With that particular Damoclesian Nightmare out of the picture, then the populace would be more able to focus on concerns like environmental issues and banking reform. Therefore, the Republican neo-cons and Blue Dog DINOs (Democrats In Name Only) absolutely cannot risk any situation that might foster the development of an informed and involved voting public.

That's my take on it, anyway.
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upstart_crow
Aug. 8th, 2009 10:12 am (UTC)
I don't usually post about political things or comment on them, but for health care I make an exception.

I get that a lot of people who oppose reform are, deep down, just scared of change and as much victims of this awful, unworkable system as we all are. But I really wish they'd educate themselves and just think a little.
vampyrwithin
Aug. 8th, 2009 02:07 pm (UTC)
"But I really wish they'd educate themselves and just think a little."

And therein lies the problem. Too many people refuse to do just that. They prefer to wander mindlessly and allow themselves to be spoon-fed misinformation & fear, letting others do the "thinking" for them.
Frustrating, to say the least.
karjack
Aug. 8th, 2009 11:17 am (UTC)
Every time I think the wingnuts can't jack the crazy up any more, they prove to me I'm just not thinking big enough.
marchenland
Aug. 8th, 2009 03:18 pm (UTC)
LOL! SO true!
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georgedollie
Aug. 8th, 2009 01:50 pm (UTC)
Healthcare debt is another way to keep the poor down. Keep them sick, in debt to you and working for cheap; they don't have time to do anything else live smarten up to what you are pulling and put a stop to it.

Palin is a dangerous lunatic. Out of all of them she scares me the most.
chelsearoad
Aug. 8th, 2009 02:57 pm (UTC)
I must respectfully disagree.

Some of these dangerous buffoons wouldn't be here if someone had killed their grannies. So it wouldn't be a total loss is all I'm saying...

Edited at 2009-08-08 02:58 pm (UTC)
muppetk
Aug. 8th, 2009 03:37 pm (UTC)
*snickers* I'm a bad person, but that's just lovely.
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liminalia
Aug. 8th, 2009 04:58 pm (UTC)
She's too busy looking at Russia to see Canada from her other window.
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(Anonymous)
Aug. 8th, 2009 03:41 pm (UTC)
Health Care
Beth.......I am so glad you put this out there and all of the comments. I have been trying to read and watch all the hoopla going on, on TV. It has me completely confused as most of my senior friends are. But I am learning everyday just how stupid and ignorant some people are
Thanks.......Patty
beeooll
Aug. 8th, 2009 03:56 pm (UTC)
The most frustrating thing for me, when it comes to health care reform or any bureaucratic debate, is that an argument pointing toward the virtues of rugged individualism is so easily faded into fear mongering- by both the inarticulate and the opposition.

On the other hand, an argument away from those ideals can unfortunately appear to be a little too ready to fly down any one of many slippery slopes.

Any time someone accepts assistance, they should also be willing to accept the contingencies placed upon it. I think that is what freaks a lot of people out. That and "reform" is too nebulous.

If people would move toward a grand-scale realistic projection on the far reaching economic costs associated with adopting a nationalized system, instead of the impossible debate on what the experience would feel like, it might be easier for more people to have a clearer point of view.

Personally, I'm divided. I don't think health care should be a roll of government- particularly a government that can't efficiently operate its long since established postal service. On the other hand, I would like to see the luxury of excellent health care considerably more affordable for people.

Sorry for the tl;dr comment but thanks for the post. Hopefully you're well.
liminalia
Aug. 8th, 2009 05:04 pm (UTC)
That's fine, as long as we consider the far-reaching economic impacts of *not* having comprehensive healthcare too, which we're already seeing to the tune of billions of dollars.

http://www.entrepreneur.com/tradejournals/article/169311045.html
In this economy, businesses cannot afford “presenteeism,” when sick workers come to work rather than stay at home. Presenteeism costs the U.S. economy $180 billion annually in lost productivity. For employers, this costs an average of $255 per employee per year and exceeds the cost of absenteeism and medical and disability benefits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sick_leave
http://www.commonwealthfund.org/usr_doc/856_Davis_hlt_productivity_USworkers.pdf
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naeelah
Aug. 8th, 2009 04:17 pm (UTC)
I can't even bring myself to try to follow the news or talk about it with people. :( It's just... how do you fight the force of such willful and reckless hate and stupidity? And it makes me so sick, not just because of the willful ignorance but because it is so potentially dangerous toward the Obamas. The anti-obama crowd is so insulated from reality that I just know some psychopath with a gun or working knowledge of bomb making is going to come out of them.

I work in a dr's office and every week, if not every day, I hear people complaining about Obama. And it's never legitimate gripes, it's full out nutbag garbage, like "He isn't even a US citizen, the mob skirted around that to get him into office." SERIOUSLY YOU GUYS?

There's no discussing it, just them being idiots and me trying not to stab them to death with my ballpoint pen. I have not yet found one person who will actually reasonably debate anything.
liminalia
Aug. 8th, 2009 05:06 pm (UTC)
"Did you know the Republican governor of Hawaii affirmed the authenticity of his birth certificate?"--I've been using that line on birthers. Sometimes it actually works.
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